AYYO, STEPH.

Ask me anything   Backdoor lover du jour. 1:19

twitter.com/ayyosteph:

    wakeupslaves:

    Six Words: ‘Black Babies Cost Less To Adopt’

    by NPR STAFF

    June 27, 2013 2:55 AM ET

    Listen to the Story


    NPR continues a series of conversations about The Race Card Project, where thousands of people have submitted their thoughts on race and cultural identity in six words. Every so often NPR Host/Special Correspondent Michele Norris will dip into those six-word stories to explore issues surrounding race and cultural identity forMorning Edition. You can find hundreds of six-word submissions and submit your own atwww.theracecardproject.com

    Americans adopt thousands of children each year. And as the nation has become increasingly diverse, and with the growth of international adoption in recent decades, many of those children don’t look like their adoptive parents. That intersection of race and adoption has prompted many people to submit their six words to The Race Card Project, including this submission from a Louisiana woman: “Black babies cost less to adopt.”

    Other contributors have also addressed the skin-color based fee structure for many adoptions, including Caryn Lantz of Minneapolis. Her six words: “Navigating world as transracial adopted family.”

    Lantz and her husband, both white, are the adoptive parents of two African-American boys. The couple had struggled for years to conceive a child. When they finally decided to turn to adoption they were willing to adopt kids of another race. But they were concerned by what they discovered about the differential costs.

    Lantz says she remembers a phone call with an adoption agency social worker. “And [she] was telling us about these different fee structures that they had based on the ethnic background of the child. And … they also had, sort of a different track for adoptive parents.”

    Moving through the process would be quicker if the family was open to adopting an African-American (not biracial) child, the social worker explained to her. “And that is because they have children of color waiting,” Lantz says. Adopting biracial, Latino, Asian or Caucasian children could be a slower process, she was told, because there were more parents waiting for them.

    i

    Courtesy of Caryn Lantz

    "And I remember hearing this and just sort of being dumbfounded that they would sort of segregate — to use a loaded term — segregate these children by ethnic background before they were even in this world," Lantz says. "That’s when I started realizing that, OK, being a parent to a child of a different ethnic background — this is gonna be some work. There’s going to be a lot of work on our end in order to be successful parents and to get our child ready for this world."

    The Race Card Project spoke with social workers, adoption agencies and adoptive parents about adoption costs based on ethnicity. We discovered that this is not widely talked about, but it is common, Norris tells NPR’s David Greene. “No one is comfortable about this.”

    Non-white children, and black children, in particular, are harder to place in adoptive homes, Norris says. So the cost is adjusted to provide an incentive for families that might otherwise be locked out of adoption due to cost, as well as “for families who really have to, maybe have a little bit of prodding to think about adopting across racial lines.”

    In other words, Norris explains, there are often altruistic reasons for the discrepancy — “but people who work in adoption say there’s one more reason, quite simply: It’s supply and demand.”

    The fees typically cover administrative costs, but also costs associated with taking care of the mother, like travel, rent, health care and counseling services. Now, some states and agencies are using a different formula to make adoption more affordable for families, with a sliding scale based on income rather than skin color. In that system, lower-income families pay less to adopt. Some agencies are also moving toward a uniform cost system where all adoptive parents would pay the same fees.

    Ultimately, the Lantz family adopted their sons from Nevada, where the sliding scale was based on income, not race. But because they were eager to find a child, they did consider agencies that used a race-based cost differential.

    Many people have written to The Race Card Project about the intersection of race and adoption.

    White Mom, Black Son, barbershop revelations — Kathy Osborne, Greensboro, S.C.

    Yes, they really are my children. — Corrie Bugby, Murray, Utah

    Race adopting outside Race … least racist. — Tod Carey, Laguna Woods, Calif.

    Family matters; race, not at all. — Phyllis Kedl, Little Canada, Minn.

    During the process, the family received four calls about potential children to be matched with them — three from states that used this race-based cost structure. “One was a full African-American child, one was a biracial child and one was a white child,” Lantz says. “And when they told me the fees for the white child, I was in a Babies R Us [store] and I remember having to sit down in the aisle and say to myself, ‘I don’t think we can afford to adopt this child if the expectant mother chose us.’ “

    The cost to adopt the Caucasian child was approximately $35,000, plus some legal expenses. “Versus when we got the first phone call about a little girl, a full African-American girl, it was about $18,000,” Lantz says. The cost for adoption of a biracial child was between $24,000 and $26,000.

    Eyes do linger on her blended family in her community, Lantz says, and curious people make comments. Two years ago, before she had a second son, she started growing concerned about the effect those comments might have on her son as he grows older.

    "I am a little nervous about what we’re gonna do when he starts to understand why someone approached us at Target and thanked us for saving babies," she explained at the time. "Or when a woman, you know, walks down the aisle of the grocery store and says, ‘What’s he mixed with?’ "

    Lantz responded to that incident, she recalls, by saying, “My son, we adopted him at birth. And, you know, his ethnic background is a little different. And we don’t know a whole bunch about it, but he is a beautiful kid, isn’t he?”

    'White Parents Raise Beautifully Diverse Children'

    That six-word submission to The Race Card Project comes from Louise Bannon of Holly Springs, N.C. Bannon and her husband Greg, both white, have two sons: Darius, Bannon’s biological son, who is biracial, and Bryce, who is adopted and African-American. Bannon writes:

    Raising, playing, growing and living as a diverse family is an extraordinary experience. It brings both good days and tough days — obstacles and disappointments, laughter and lightheartedness. The journey is full of stares — stares full of curiosity, stares full of love and stares of hatefulness from the people we encounter from time to time in our lives. While both my husband and I want to believe that society has risen above racism — we have a biracial president after all — it still exists and we talk our kids through it and about it all of the time, especially our teenager, who is now driving and looks like an adult — especially to a police officer. I wouldn’t change anything about our experience! We learn something new every day and we share our openness, love and acceptance with everyone we know/meet. Life is precious!

    Share317Comment

    More From The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays

    the race card project: six-word essays’12 Years A Slave’ Inspires ‘True Conversations’ About Slavery

    the race card project: six-word essaysA Woman Comes To Terms With Her Family’s Slave-Owning Past

    the race card project: six-word essaysDiscovering Grief And Freedom In A Family’s History Of Slavery

    More From The Race Card Project: Six-Word Essays

    Comments

    hometopicsprogramsdonatestationsnpr shopsign in / register

    Support NPR

    HelpContactTerms of UsePrivacyText-Only

    ©2014 NPR

    — 5 days ago with 9 notes
    wakeupslaves:

The Problem With Saying ‘Black Babies Cost Less to Adopt’

STACIA L. BROWNJUL 1 2013, 3:28 PM ET



Wikimedia Commons

Every year, I teach writer Elna Baker’s essay, “Babies Buying Babies” to my freshman composition classes as an introduction to narrative and critical thinking. We listen to her This American Life recording and I watch the students cringe, chuckle, and scoff as she recounts her former job at FAO Schwartz, where white Upper East Side moms refused to buy certain dolls because of their skin color. In the end, as non-black minority dolls gradually begin to be “adopted,” Baker admits, “What were left were incubator upon incubator of black baby dolls.”

Class discussion is predictable. “It’s [insert year here]! I can’t believe we haven’t gotten past this!” Obama is often evoked as an arbiter of how much less racist these18-year-olds think the country is now than it was “back in the day.” Usually my goal, to remind students of the insidious ways in which racial prejudice impacts even the most innocuous of activities, is achieved. But last year, a black student raised her hand. “I don’t see that much wrong with this,” she shrugged. “My mom only bought me dolls that looked like me, too.” As other students nodded, I thought to myself, it’s time to reassess this lesson.

For that class, the takeaway wasn’t that white moms didn’t want to “adopt” black dolls. It was that more black families should. That sentiment can be applied to the topic of real-life adoptions. There is merit in matching black babies with parents who look like them - particularly if a greater number of those babies are left languishing in the adoption and foster care systems, and especially when those babies are discussed like salable commodities.

NPR recently launched The Race Card Project, an initiative that invites participants to submit six-word sentences related to race. Morning Edition dissected one such sentence last week in a piece titled “Six Words: Black Babies Cost Less to Adopt.”

As a black woman, here is what those six words immediately conjured: 1857, where a one-year-old black child, born a slave, could be sold for $100 in the Forsythe County area of South Carolina. The price of a slave child varied widely, according to a number of factors—most notably health and physical strength. The ability to bear children also spiked the monetary value of slave girls and women of childbearing age. According to Marie Jenkins Schwartz’s book Birthing a Slave, a girl of 15 who had no children sold for $800, but a breeding woman sold for $1,500” in 19th-century Tennessee.

It’s 2013. I can’t believe we haven’t gotten past this.

Related Story

The Dark, Sad Side of Domestic Adoption

NPR included a screen-grab from an anonymous adoption agency, reflecting the racial breakdown of adoption costs. It reflects that white and biracial babies “cost” upwards of $30,000, while the cost to adopt black babies is around $17,000. But this is far from a new phenomenon. A 2002ABC News report pointed to everything from “supply-and-demand,” to Medicare’s payment of birth mothers’ prenatal expenses, to the length of time adoptive parents were willing to wait for a child as reasons for the different costs of adopting babies of different races.

Despite those possibilities, the key factor remains race. Across racial lines, fewer adoptive families seem to want black babies. A 2010 Centre for Economic Policy research study found that probability that a non-African-American baby will attract adoptive parent interest is seven times as high as the corresponding probability for an African-American baby. Christine Ward Gailey’sBlue ribbon babies: Race class and gender in U.S. adoption practicesuggests that stereotypes about black and low-income mothers could be to blame. Her findings are cited in a University of Michigan study on the culture of poverty:

Gailey found that parents who adopted internationally thought that their White or “closer to White” (i.e., racial identities that are not White or Black) children came from “better stock” with “greater moral fiber” than children placed in the US who are predominantly Black.The Adoption Institute’s 2002 National Adoption Attitude study lists black participants as having the lower support for and experience with agency adoption. A 1997 Princeton Survey Research Associates poll offers investigates why:Among black Americans, 69 percent—twice as many as among the whites—favored having teen-age mothers raise their babies themselves.Blacks were also less likely than whites to say that they themselves would place a child for adoption if they could not provide for the baby. And about one in three of the blacks said adoptive parents got less satisfaction out of raising an adopted child than a biological one, compared with one in seven of the whites. Transracial adoption has been one approach to ensuring that more black children find homes with adoptive families. With the passing of 1996 Multi-Ethnic Placement Act, the race, color, and national origin of adoptive parents was no longer taken into account when matching children with adoptive families. In the near decade that has followed, transracial adoption has gradually increased, since white, non-Hispanic parents made up 63 percent of those who adopt from foster care, 71 percent of those who adopted privately within the U.S., and 92 percent of those who adopt internationally.Of approximately 120,000 children adopted in the U.S. annually, transracial adoptions now account for 40 percent.

Transracial adoption is not without its critics. The North American Council on Adoptable Children, the Child Welfare League of America, the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption and the National Association of Black Social Workers have all urged changes to the Multi-Ethnic Placement Act, citing its “color-blind” approach as problematic for the development of adopted children’s racial and social identities. To address those concerns, there’s a case to be made for more black women and men—both married and single—to consider adopting black babies.

For writer Nefertiti Austin, the decision was a no-brainer. “I was in my late 30s, had a steady U.S. History teaching gig at a couple of local community colleges and was ready to be a mommy through adoption. It seemed like a logical step to take.”

Austin, who is writing a book about black adoptive single motherhood, opted for a son. Disparities in adoptive preference aren’t just racial. Boys are also less likely to be placed than girls. “I knew going into the adoption process that black boys were more plentiful.” Her choice was not without criticism. “Black men weren’t particularly keen on a single, black woman raising a black man. Also, some Black women don’t think that a woman can raise a boy. I knew that building a male community for my son would be key to his development.”

Some reports assert that the adoption process is quicker for black children.African American Adoption Online claims, “For bi-racial or full African American adoptions, a family is sometimes matched in a few weeks with a birth mother.” Austin’s son was placed with her at six months old, but she is hesitant to attribute it to race. “That was more circumstance and timing.”

One reason why agency adoption may be lower among black prospective parents is that black families are more likely to engage in “kinship care.” Kinship care, or the practice of caring for the children of relatives, is far more common in black communities than agency adoption, according to the National Adoption Institute. Interestingly, black families were found more likely than whites to consider adopting children with a behavioral issue. And though level of education was a determinant in black participants openness to adoption, income wasn’t found to be much of a deterrent.

Austin believes that single black women are concerned about the social stigma they may face by adopting and becoming “single mothers by choice.” “If we could remember our legacy of taking in others’ kinfolk during the great migrations of the 19th and 20th centuries, I think more Black women would be less skittish about adoption.”

Austin agrees, citing free and low-cost county programs, the federal adoption tax credit, and free healthcare until the child turns 18, as reasons why income may not be a reason forgo adoption. “Whether or not a person is on the high end of the earning spectrum is less important than a willingness and ability to parent. Those serious about adoption will find it rewarding and a way to empower our community, whether they adopt a family member or stranger. And since a large percentage of the children in foster care are black, I believe that it is our responsibility to take them in.”

For black families who are interested in adopting black babies, several agencies offer help specific to their desired placement arrangement. Homes for Black Children in Detroit has led to the adoption of 1,800 children since 1976, and the online resource, Lifetime Adoption, boasts a high preference of black birth mothers requesting to be matched with black families.

Regardless of who chooses to adopting them, black children don’t “cost less.” They shouldn’t be discussed as “priced” commodities. Austin believes that the emphasis on race in adoption cost is misguided. “Does it cost to adopt? Yes. But the costs are not dictated by race, rather the type of adoption. The statement [‘Black babies cost less to adopt’] is offensive, untrue, undermines the seriousness of raising a child, and continues the business of de-valuing Black children.”

 
” it sounds more like White people not willing to value black babies as important assets to humanity

    wakeupslaves:

    The Problem With Saying ‘Black Babies Cost Less to Adopt’

    STACIA L. BROWNJUL 1 2013, 3:28 PM ET

    Wikimedia Commons

    Every year, I teach writer Elna Baker’s essay, “Babies Buying Babies” to my freshman composition classes as an introduction to narrative and critical thinking. We listen to her This American Life recording and I watch the students cringe, chuckle, and scoff as she recounts her former job at FAO Schwartz, where white Upper East Side moms refused to buy certain dolls because of their skin color. In the end, as non-black minority dolls gradually begin to be “adopted,” Baker admits, “What were left were incubator upon incubator of black baby dolls.”

    Class discussion is predictable. “It’s [insert year here]! I can’t believe we haven’t gotten past this!” Obama is often evoked as an arbiter of how much less racist these18-year-olds think the country is now than it was “back in the day.” Usually my goal, to remind students of the insidious ways in which racial prejudice impacts even the most innocuous of activities, is achieved. But last year, a black student raised her hand. “I don’t see that much wrong with this,” she shrugged. “My mom only bought me dolls that looked like me, too.” As other students nodded, I thought to myself, it’s time to reassess this lesson.

    For that class, the takeaway wasn’t that white moms didn’t want to “adopt” black dolls. It was that more black families should. That sentiment can be applied to the topic of real-life adoptions. There is merit in matching black babies with parents who look like them - particularly if a greater number of those babies are left languishing in the adoption and foster care systems, and especially when those babies are discussed like salable commodities.

    NPR recently launched The Race Card Project, an initiative that invites participants to submit six-word sentences related to race. Morning Edition dissected one such sentence last week in a piece titled “Six Words: Black Babies Cost Less to Adopt.”

    As a black woman, here is what those six words immediately conjured: 1857, where a one-year-old black child, born a slave, could be sold for $100 in the Forsythe County area of South Carolina. The price of a slave child varied widely, according to a number of factors—most notably health and physical strength. The ability to bear children also spiked the monetary value of slave girls and women of childbearing age. According to Marie Jenkins Schwartz’s book Birthing a Slave, a girl of 15 who had no children sold for $800, but a breeding woman sold for $1,500” in 19th-century Tennessee.

    It’s 2013. I can’t believe we haven’t gotten past this.

    Related Story

    The Dark, Sad Side of Domestic Adoption

    NPR included a screen-grab from an anonymous adoption agency, reflecting the racial breakdown of adoption costs. It reflects that white and biracial babies “cost” upwards of $30,000, while the cost to adopt black babies is around $17,000. But this is far from a new phenomenon. A 2002ABC News report pointed to everything from “supply-and-demand,” to Medicare’s payment of birth mothers’ prenatal expenses, to the length of time adoptive parents were willing to wait for a child as reasons for the different costs of adopting babies of different races.

    Despite those possibilities, the key factor remains race. Across racial lines, fewer adoptive families seem to want black babies. A 2010 Centre for Economic Policy research study found that probability that a non-African-American baby will attract adoptive parent interest is seven times as high as the corresponding probability for an African-American baby. Christine Ward Gailey’sBlue ribbon babies: Race class and gender in U.S. adoption practicesuggests that stereotypes about black and low-income mothers could be to blame. Her findings are cited in a University of Michigan study on the culture of poverty:

    Gailey found that parents who adopted internationally thought that their White or “closer to White” (i.e., racial identities that are not White or Black) children came from “better stock” with “greater moral fiber” than children placed in the US who are predominantly Black.The Adoption Institute’s 2002 National Adoption Attitude study lists black participants as having the lower support for and experience with agency adoption. A 1997 Princeton Survey Research Associates poll offers investigates why:Among black Americans, 69 percent—twice as many as among the whites—favored having teen-age mothers raise their babies themselves.Blacks were also less likely than whites to say that they themselves would place a child for adoption if they could not provide for the baby. And about one in three of the blacks said adoptive parents got less satisfaction out of raising an adopted child than a biological one, compared with one in seven of the whites. Transracial adoption has been one approach to ensuring that more black children find homes with adoptive families. With the passing of 1996 Multi-Ethnic Placement Act, the race, color, and national origin of adoptive parents was no longer taken into account when matching children with adoptive families. In the near decade that has followed, transracial adoption has gradually increased, since white, non-Hispanic parents made up 63 percent of those who adopt from foster care, 71 percent of those who adopted privately within the U.S., and 92 percent of those who adopt internationally.Of approximately 120,000 children adopted in the U.S. annually, transracial adoptions now account for 40 percent.

    Transracial adoption is not without its critics. The North American Council on Adoptable Children, the Child Welfare League of America, the Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption and the National Association of Black Social Workers have all urged changes to the Multi-Ethnic Placement Act, citing its “color-blind” approach as problematic for the development of adopted children’s racial and social identities. To address those concerns, there’s a case to be made for more black women and men—both married and single—to consider adopting black babies.

    For writer Nefertiti Austin, the decision was a no-brainer. “I was in my late 30s, had a steady U.S. History teaching gig at a couple of local community colleges and was ready to be a mommy through adoption. It seemed like a logical step to take.”

    Austin, who is writing a book about black adoptive single motherhood, opted for a son. Disparities in adoptive preference aren’t just racial. Boys are also less likely to be placed than girls. “I knew going into the adoption process that black boys were more plentiful.” Her choice was not without criticism. “Black men weren’t particularly keen on a single, black woman raising a black man. Also, some Black women don’t think that a woman can raise a boy. I knew that building a male community for my son would be key to his development.”

    Some reports assert that the adoption process is quicker for black children.African American Adoption Online claims, “For bi-racial or full African American adoptions, a family is sometimes matched in a few weeks with a birth mother.” Austin’s son was placed with her at six months old, but she is hesitant to attribute it to race. “That was more circumstance and timing.”

    One reason why agency adoption may be lower among black prospective parents is that black families are more likely to engage in “kinship care.” Kinship care, or the practice of caring for the children of relatives, is far more common in black communities than agency adoption, according to the National Adoption Institute. Interestingly, black families were found more likely than whites to consider adopting children with a behavioral issue. And though level of education was a determinant in black participants openness to adoption, income wasn’t found to be much of a deterrent.

    Austin believes that single black women are concerned about the social stigma they may face by adopting and becoming “single mothers by choice.” “If we could remember our legacy of taking in others’ kinfolk during the great migrations of the 19th and 20th centuries, I think more Black women would be less skittish about adoption.”

    Austin agrees, citing free and low-cost county programs, the federal adoption tax credit, and free healthcare until the child turns 18, as reasons why income may not be a reason forgo adoption. “Whether or not a person is on the high end of the earning spectrum is less important than a willingness and ability to parent. Those serious about adoption will find it rewarding and a way to empower our community, whether they adopt a family member or stranger. And since a large percentage of the children in foster care are black, I believe that it is our responsibility to take them in.”

    For black families who are interested in adopting black babies, several agencies offer help specific to their desired placement arrangement. Homes for Black Children in Detroit has led to the adoption of 1,800 children since 1976, and the online resource, Lifetime Adoption, boasts a high preference of black birth mothers requesting to be matched with black families.

    Regardless of who chooses to adopting them, black children don’t “cost less.” They shouldn’t be discussed as “priced” commodities. Austin believes that the emphasis on race in adoption cost is misguided. “Does it cost to adopt? Yes. But the costs are not dictated by race, rather the type of adoption. The statement [‘Black babies cost less to adopt’] is offensive, untrue, undermines the seriousness of raising a child, and continues the business of de-valuing Black children.”

     
    ” it sounds more like White people not willing to value black babies as important assets to humanity

    — 5 days ago with 20 notes

    wakeupslaves:

    disciplesofmalcolm:

    Dr. Martin Luther King reflecting on his “I have a dream” speech, the state of Africans in America, and the Vietnam War.

    "I must confess that that dream that I had that day has at many points turned into a nightmare."

    Mumia: A Half-Century of Civil Wrongs

    “For the Black bourgeoisie,” the 50 years since passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act “has been a rush of opportunity and entre into doors once closed to them,” said Mumia Abu Jamal, the nation’s best known political prisoner, in a report for Prison Radio. However, “for the Black poor and working class,” mass incarceration has made “civil rights as ancient and distant as Reconstruction.”

    — 5 days ago with 178 notes
    Black Women In The Ivy League: "Everything's Not So Pretty At The Top" →

    (Source: ethiopienne, via howtobeterrell)

    — 5 days ago with 251 notes

    exampleofamplesamples:

    Anita Baker | Sweet Love

    Sample for “Think Good Thoughts” by 9th Wonder and “Hoe Cakes” by MF DOOM

    (via howtobeterrell)

    — 5 days ago with 732 notes
    "And now what do we have? We have the right to vote while we are homeless. We have the right to vote while we are jobless. We have the right to vote while our children are miseducated; this right that we were told would bring us a cornucopia of blessings and freedoms. We have the right to ride the front of the buses, we’re the only ones riding on it. Yes. We have the right to sit at the lunch counter with white folks and we ain’t got the money to buy a sandwich. We got all of these abstract rights but nothing real. This is the situation we face. We inhabit neighborhoods where the industries have flown away and left us of jobs and opportunities. Why? Because we have not paid attention to the realities of our lives. And now we are overrun with violence, because violence is the result of social disorganization. Violence is the result of a nation not being able to feed and clothe it’s people legitimately."
    Dr. Amos N. Wilson (via disciplesofmalcolm)

    (Source: youtube.com, via howtobeterrell)

    — 5 days ago with 578 notes
    b4-16:

Left: Reliquary arm of St. Valentine 14th century Swiss Right: 2 Chainz

    b4-16:

    Left: Reliquary arm of St. Valentine 14th century Swiss Right: 2 Chainz

    (via unsuccessfulmetalbenders)

    — 1 week ago with 12983 notes

    thanoblesavage:

    Oakland Teen Akintunde Ahmad Has 5.0 GPA, Scores 2100 On SAT, Accepted Into Ivy League Schools

    (Source: thefiiix.com, via unsuccessfulmetalbenders)

    — 1 week ago with 35946 notes

    kenobi-wan-obi:

    when someone say hi to ya bae for too long

    (via unsuccessfulmetalbenders)

    — 1 week ago with 70076 notes
    herspanic:

rodenn:

This laffy taffy is getting deep.


***truth tea

    herspanic:

    rodenn:

    This laffy taffy is getting deep.

    ***truth tea

    (Source: jgavaris, via unsuccessfulmetalbenders)

    — 1 week ago with 184651 notes